4 Ways to Get Your Money Right This Fall

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Forget Pennywise the clown. We know spooky.

Happy Halloween!

Here’s something to truly terrify you on this All Hallows’ Eve: The average U.S. household had $8,437 of credit card debt in August this year. That means many Americans will be paying for their summer vacations and halloween costumes well into 2019. That’s why we put together this list of the top 5 ways to get your money right this fall.

The best place to start tackling your debt is to back away from your credit cards. One of the fastest and most effective ways to start tackling credit card debt is to stop adding to the amount you already owe.

#1: Come up with a plan

As tons of stores and weirdly eager neighbors are happy to remind us, the holiday shopping season is nearly here. But holiday shopping with a large credit card balance can be a recipe for financial disaster. You may want to start your planning by checkout our 5 best hacks for eliminating credit card debt.


#2: Set a budget

No “one weird trick” here. Once you’ve developed a plan, it’s time to put it in action. Your plan is only as effective as your budget so make sure you’ve checked out these budgeting tips.

#3: Get a Holiday Savings Account

You can get a savings account for pretty much anything, believe it or not, and that includes your holiday shopping, vacations, back to school budgets and plenty of other options. Armed with a plan, a budget and an interest-earning savings account, holiday spending is something you can relax and responsibly enjoy. If you’re on the fence about a savings account, here’s quick resource we put together to help you decide.

#4: Don’t Repeat the Same Mistakes

If you don’t want to be burdened by credit card debt for years, you have to commit to long-term change. Change can be subtle or drastic depending on you planning, budgeting and commitment. You can start simple by finding ways to save—whether you’re a student, young professional, freelancer or artist, there are products from community banks and credit unions   designed just for you.


#5: Positive Reinforcement

Whatever steps you decide to take, acknowledging debt may seem like a small thing, but it’s the first step toward handling it responsibly. So, good job! Debt sucks—it’s complicated and confusing for almost everyone. Lifesaver makes it easier than ever before to find what’s right for you.

3 Best Banks in New York for Students and Young Professionals

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It’s fall in New York—that means schools (and the U.N.!) are back in session, and crosstown traffic is a mess. Whether you’re a college freshman, a graduate student or a young professional just making your way in the city, there are three local banks you need to know about if you’re serious about establishing (or reestablishing) New York as your homebase.  

Between absurdly high rents, entry-level wages and student loan payments, finding ways to save if you’re under 25 isn’t easy. That’s why we’ve compiled a quick list of the three best banks in New York for students and young professionals.

  1. Ridgewood Savings Bank

    What we love:

    This member-owned community bank is the largest mutual savings bank in New York State and offers hassle-free checking accounts for students. If you’re looking for a community-centric approach to banking, Ridgewood might be a good fit. The bank offers several no- to low-fee account options with 24/7 access via online and mobile banking. They also boast 22 branch locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Long Island, so wherever your adventures take you, Ridgewood’s probably there.

    What they offer:

    Student Advantage Account: This is a great starter checking account for students with a low $25 minimum to open. The best part, though, is that it has no monthly maintenance fees. Designed with students in mind, this checking account offers a one-time annual “oops” fee waiver, letting students experience that riveting first “OH $*%@” moment of overdrafting—minus the insufficient funds fee.

  2. Dime Bank

    What we love:

    If community is what matters to you (and you maybe own one of these t-shirts),  then Brooklyn-based Dime Community Bank hits all the right marks. Founded in 1864, Dime has deep roots in Brooklyn extending over 150 years. You’ve probably walked past their iconic building. With four locations in Williamsburg and 24 more across Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Long Island, Dime offers a variety of no-fee checking and savings accounts.

    What they offer:

    Perfectly Free Checking: This one really lives up to its name, and then goes a little extra. With no monthly fees, no minimum balances, and no purchase requirements, it also offers 50 free personalized checks and a "thank you" gift for opening.

  3. Webster Bank

    What we love:

    This Connecticut-based bank is one of the largest regional financial institutions in the Northeast with over 175 branches between New York and Boston.

    What they offer:

    Student Checking Account: This free checking account is especially designed for students and is guaranteed to remain free for five years, with no monthly maintenance fees and a low $50 minimum to open. Customers also get up to four ATM fees refund every month month, and one overdraft fee refund per academic year.

We know that saving money in the city is hard. That’s why Lifesaver makes finding the right tools easier than ever before by intelligently matching you with the very best financial offerings from your community, and with technology companies from around the web. Check us out in the App Store to browse your matches today!

5 Best Hacks for Eliminating Credit Card Debt

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Acknowledging debt may seem like a small thing, but it’s the first step toward handling it responsibly. So, good job!

Debt sucks—it’s complicated and confusing for almost everyone. For self-employed contractors and freelancers, how you manage your debt is especially important, since your personal credit directly affects your business credit, and therefore your ability to work and earn a living.

So, here it is—Lifesaver’s “cheat mode” for crushing debt.

#1: Stop Piling On the Debt

Back away from your credit cards. That means all of them—the personal and business cards.

One of the fastest and most effective ways to start tackling credit card debt is to stop adding to the amount you already owe. You may find it harder and harder to reach for your wallet when you know that it means dipping into your hard-earned cash.

This may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised by how many people attempt to combat debt while continuing to rack it up. So, resist the urge to swipe while you strategize and implement a plan to help you conquer your debt.  

#2: Confronting Your Debt

If you want to slay the debt dragon, you have to start by knowing exactly how much you owe and to whom. Gather all of your credit card statements, open a spreadsheet, and let’s start crunching numbers. Start by detangling your debt, separating out your personal credit card debt from your business debt. Go card by card, entering the balance for each. List important details like the amount owed and the annual percentage yield on that credit card.

Hopefully, you’re relieved by what you see. But if you’re feeling slightly depressed after knowing exactly how in the red you are, take comfort in knowing that we’re halfway there toward putting together a solution.

#3 Creating a Budget

Understanding your income and expenses allows you to start planning and experimenting with a few differents ways to save and lower your debt. We’ve got a step by step guide here. Once you’ve listed your total monthly income and expenses, subtract your total income from your total fixed expenses. The formula couldn’t be simpler:

(Total monthly income) — (Total fixed monthly expenses) = Money left over for spending (fun) or saving

Unfortunately, debt sometimes does require you to cut back, and that likely means you have to reallocate some your discretionary spending toward paying off your debt. Monthly subscriptions are a good place to start. Individually, their cost seems minimal, but these costs add up at end of each month. Besides, do you really need all three or four paid memberships to those music/movie/TV streaming platforms? Determine a monthly percentage of money that you’re comfortable with putting toward paying off credit card debt. Ensure the amount you choose works even when your income fluctuates. Ideally, you want to pay over the monthly minimum, so you can reduce the interest and the principal you owe.      

#4: Maximize Your Cash Flow

There are several ways to increase the amount of cash you have each month. You can start simple by reducing your spending. Put yourself and your business on a spending diet for a couple of weeks or months. Easy things like brewing your own morning coffee/tea, or preparing lunch at home, help avoid unnecessary expenses—for some, this alone can help save upwards of $200 a month. Spending diets are a test of wills and wallets, so tailor it to your financial specifications.

Try to make more money. OK, have your eye roll, but hear us out. It might be time to monetize your side-hustle. Maybe you‘ve been cooking, singing or making your friends laugh for free. Consider trying to generate revenue from your passion on the side.

You could also consider adjusting your fee or payment structure for gigs. This is easier and more flexible than it sounds. You could start by getting paid faster. Maybe you have a recurring gig or client that’s mostly great, but takes forever to pay you. Automating your invoicing system may help minimize the time it takes to get your hard-earned cash. Requesting partial payments for projects upfront is another way to increase your monthly inflows.

#5: Work Smarter

Working smarter means realizing that your credit card habits need to change for the better and, more importantly, for the long term. If you don’t want to find yourself buried in credit card debt again, you have to start incorporating these tricks into your regular money management routines.

Working smarter also means using the right tools for the job. Are you being eaten alive by monthly checking account fees? Alternatively, maybe your savings is just sitting in an account collecting dust—rather than accruing interest. Lifesaver makes it easier than ever to find the financial institutions and services that fit your wallet and lifestyle, so take advantage.

 

Do Savings Accounts Really Work?

Don't even think about it!

Don't even think about it!

So, you’re unsure about opening that savings account everyone is always nagging you about.

“There’s no point, interest rates are way low right now,” says that guy who just dropped two grand on VIP passes to Coachella. “Besides, the smartest way to tie up your money right now is in crypto,” says your friend who really needs the price of BitCoin to start going up again.

Okay, we get that you’re skeptical, and it’s only normal after all. It’s your hard-earned cash we’re talking about here. So we did some research and compared a few different approaches to try and figure out if savings accounts really do work.

But first things first: If you want to measure the effectiveness of something, you have to know what it is!

What is a Savings Account?

Savings accounts are issued and held by financial institutions like banks and credit unions. As their name suggests, they are widely considered a safe place to keep savings. But unlike checking accounts, savings accounts rarely offer debit cards or checks, and limit customers’ number of withdrawals per month to six.

Who Are They For?

Since most people need to access their cash more than six times a month, savings accounts are great for money not needed right away—like emergency funds and long-term savings.

So, why do people open savings accounts instead of just leaving all their cash in checking?

Advantages of a Savings Account

In a word: interest. Savings accounts can earn customers’ additional money (called interest) on their savings. How much interest is earned is determined by the amount of money in the account, and how long it’s left there.

Safety is another advantage. With FDIC-member banks and credit unions, the federal government insures your money up to $250,000 for each account you have—so you should always bank with an FDIC-insured financial institution. That means that if there’s a fire, flood or some other catastrophe, or if there’s a run on the bank, your money stays safe.

 

Some Benchmarks for Comparison

  • Access to your Money: How easy or difficult is it to access your cash?

  • Potential interest-earnings: Can your saved cash make you even more money?

  • Your money’s safety: How safe/trustworthy is the place you keep your cash?

Great—so we’ve covered exactly what a savings account is, and we have our benchmarks, as well as a few important questions to ask. Now let’s compare savings accounts to other saving methods by rating them according to these benchmarks. To keep things simple, we’ll use a rating system of High, Medium and Low.

 

The Savings Account Method

Access: Medium

Savings accounts provide limited but relatively frequent access (six times per month).

Interest: High

Savings accounts are interest-earning so the potential of earning interest is real. To sweeten the deal, the more money you save, and the longer you save it, the more interest you stand to earn.

Safety: High

If you open an account with an FDIC-member bank or credit union, your money is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation up to $250,000, no matter what.

 

The Cookie Jar/Under-the-mattress Method

Forking over your cash to a financial institution makes you a bit wary, so instead you keep it close—like really close. The downside is you’ve taken on all of the risk of keeping your money safe, and have little recourse in the event of theft or loss. Plus, that money isn’t exactly working hard for you.

Access: High

You have ready access to your cash, which can be both a good and bad thing, depending on how good you are at fighting the temptation to dip into your stash.

Interest: Low

Actually, to be more accurate, interest is non-existent. Neither the mattress nor the cookie jar can generate interest (though we can think of someone who wishes it were otherwise).

Safety: Low

It may surprise you, but your home isn’t a safe place for your savings. Things like fire, flooding and crime all put your money at risk. Plus, a lack of records or statements makes replacement or reimbursement of your money nearly impossible.

 

The Checking Account Method

You already have a checking account, and you keep a little extra in your account for a rainy day. Why get a savings account? Well, it all comes down to interest. There’s a good chance you’re missing out on interest-earnings, since savings accounts generally offer higher rates than checking accounts. In fact, most checking accounts don’t offer interest at all.

Access: Medium to High

You’ve chosen to keep your money huddled together in one account, which means only budgeting and self-control are keeping you from dipping into your funds.  

Interest: Low

You might be earning interest, but you would probably be earning more interest with a dedicated savings account. Maintaining your spending and savings cash together might seem like a good idea, but constant fluctuations in your account balance may cause you to lose out on potential interest earnings.  

Safety: Medium

You’ve essentially put all your eggs in one checking account basket. This is generally okay if your cash is held at an FDIC-member bank or credit union, but it can still lead to some annoying inconveniences. Loss or fraud may cause you to temporarily lose access to your cash or rainy day funds, while you wait for your bank to unfreeze the account and send you a new card. Let’s just hope nothing happens that requires emergency money while you wait.

 

The Trusted Loved One Method

Your honest enough with yourself to know that ready access to your dough is just not for you. So, you hand a bit of your cash over to someone you know and trust. They want what’s best for you, and they won’t let you blow $200 on an impulse buy Instant Pot. That’s some seriously great Adulting on your part, but it’s an awful lot of responsibility, trust and pressure on your loved one.  

Access: Medium

By design, you’ve chosen a spouse, parent or other loved one to safeguard your cash. But in reality, you’ve just outsourced the cookie jar. (See above.)

Interest: Low

Zilch, nothing. Like the underside of your mattress, your loved one can’t generate any interest.  

Safety: Low

It may feel safe to keep your cash with the ones you love but your designated loved one (and by extension you) have little recourse in the event of loss or theft.

 

Results

Yes, savings accounts work! In fact, not only do they work—they work really well. Everyone’s been right the whole time. Savings accounts are an effective, safe place to store your cash, and they typically allow you to earn some interest in doing so. They work even better with a dedicated savings budget.

And if you’re ready to pull the trigger on getting started saving and need some help finding the right bank for you, well, we’ve got you covered. Download Lifesaver today to view your best matches.

Saving While Self-employed: Tips from the Trenches

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Let’s start by admitting that budgeting and saving when you’re a self-employed freelancer or artist is exceptionally hard. How do you set a monthly budget when your income changes from month to month, or week to week? Having to figure it all out on your own is no joke, so that’s why we’ve put together a few tips to help you save. You’re at your best when you can focus on chasing the dream without stressing over your wallet.

When you can’t predict your income with certainty, focus instead on what you can predict. Setting a budget like a pro begins with figuring out fixed expenses.

Setting a Budget

It all begins with identifying fixed expenses: the cost of being housed, fed and with access to the things needed to keeping you hustling. Carefully—and honestly!—distinguish these from other variable types of discretionary spending: happy hour drinks, eating out, movie tickets or Netflix, online shopping, Lyft rides—the usual suspects for those times you want to treat yourself.

Identifying and Calculating Fixed Expenses

Fixed expenses are usually:

  • Education or childcare costs, including things like tuition or daycare

  • Transportation costs such as car notes, insurance, and gas, or public transit fares like Metrocards and bus passes

  • Housing costs, such as rent or mortgage

  • Outstanding debt payments like student loans, credit card debt

  • Utilities (gas, heat, water, phone, internet)

  • Groceries and food

  • Healthcare costs (insurance premiums, plus any prescriptions or medicine)

  • Taxes: As a self-employed artist or freelancer, you’re solely responsible for withholding and paying employment taxes so alway, always, alway set aside money for taxes. If you’re unsure how much to set aside use a recent tax return as a basis for your estimate.

(One easy way to remember these is by looking at the first letter of each: ETHOUGHT.) Calculate your total monthly fixed costs by adding all individual fixed expenses together.

Living on a freelance or self-employed artist’s budget often means relying on last month’s previous earnings. Because income can fluctuate, it’s mission critical to know exactly how much money to put aside each month to cover expenses for the following month. Tracking fixed costs lets you know exactly how much of your monthly income you need to save in order to cover living and work-related expenses for next month.

List and Calculate All Your Sources of Income

Tracking your income is as important as tracking your expenses. Figuring out exactly how much you bring in each month helps you plan and manage your budget effectively. Your sources of income include earnings from any jobs, residual income from royalties, income from any disability benefits or government programs, and any financial help you maybe receiving.

Calculate your total monthly earnings by adding all your sources of income together.

Identify Patterns in Your Income

Budgeting is always easier when it’s more predictable.

As a freelancer, you expect your income to fluctuate, but these fluctuations aren’t necessarily random. Tracking your monthly income overtime gives you the historic data necessary to recognize patterns and make inferences on your earnings. Look for trends in your monthly income. Do your lean months correspond with off-seasons or low-demand periods in your industry? Do you travel more frequently at certain times in the year? These types of questions help make your income and expense more predictable. Harmonize your wallet and your hustle by anticipating expenses whenever possible, and saving for them when times are good. Incorporate any trends you discover into your budget planning.

Building Your Budget

Now that you’ve listed your total monthly income and expenses, subtract your total income from your total fixed expenses. The formula couldn’t be simpler:

(Total monthly income) — (Total fixed monthly expenses) = Savings & Fun

50/30/20 Rule

Okay, so you’ve crunched the numbers, and even looked over your expenses and found a few places to cut back (seriously, you should!). Now what? How do you know if you’re saving enough, or spending too much?

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A great rule of thumb for budgeting is the 50/30/20 rule. The idea here is to:

  1. Limit your fixed expenses to a maximum of 50% of your total monthly income

  2. Limit your discretionary spending to 30% of your total monthly income

  3. Allocate the remaining 20% of your income toward savings

For many freelancers in New York, the cost of housing can make hitting these budget specs pretty tricky, but aim for as close to this breakdown as possible—especially for saving.

Other Tips and Tricks

Save Money by Automating Bill Payments

One of the easiest ways to save money is to avoid late fees, penalties and, if possible, interest associated with past due or late payments. Falling behind on payments can have a ton of expensive side-effects, all potentially ruinous to your hustle. These range from expensive fees to increased interest and lower credit scores, and even potential repossession of property. Automating your bill payments is a great set-it-and-forget-it way to avoid late fees, but does require you to have a good handle on both your income and expenses. Avoid potential overdraft fees from your bank by ensuring you have enough funds in your account to cover automatic bill payments.

Start an Emergency Fund

Open an account dedicated to potential emergencies and unexpected expenses, or anything else Murphy’s Law might have in store. A separate account is a great place to put some extra cash when times are good. Your emergency fund is a safety net for emergencies and unexpected expenses only! Consider an online savings account if you’re tempted to dip into your emergency stash.

Fight the Urge to Splurge, and Use Credit Cards Wisely

Resist the temptation to swipe your way out of a financial rough patch by leaning on your credit card. Each time you swipe your card, you’re increasing debt expense—a fixed expense!—and therefore reducing your available monthly income in the future. The same of course holds true for treating yourself: splurging today means less savings for tomorrow. Don’t stick Future-You with the stress and responsibility of solving financial problems created on a whim!

Find the Best Financial Offerings for You

As previously discussed in our post The 6 Best Banks for New York City Freelancers and Artists, discovering banks and credit unions that jive with your lifestyle can be tricky. But all the clever planning in the world might still go awry if you're not using the right tools for the job. Lifesaver makes finding the right tools easier than ever before by intelligently matching you with the very best financial offerings from your community, and with technology companies from around the web. 

Questions? Comments? Feel free to get in touch!

The 6 Best Banks for New York City Freelancers and Artists

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If you’re a self-employed contractor, artist or freelancer working in New York, finding the right bank isn’t an easy task. Chances are that the big banks on every corner aren’t exactly designed for the financial realities of self-employed life (also known as “the dream”). With a fluctuating monthly income, inconsistent access to direct deposit, and requirements that differ from the typical nine-to-fiver, freelancers and artists often find themselves scratching their heads when trying to figure out where they might fit in at a large national bank.

Traditional fee structures at large national bank chains, with their minimum balance and direct deposit requirements, usually mean that self-employed folks are paying more in monthly account fees, or missing out on potential interest they could be earning. And it isn’t just bank accounts that these individuals have to worry about—they also have to figure out retirement benefits and financial planning tools that their desk-jockey counterparts usually get through their employers.

But the fact is, across the five boroughs you are nearly a quarter-million strong—and you’ve got some really fantastic options available to you. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of the best banks for freelancers and artists with their nose to the grindstone here in New York.

Amalgamated Bank

What we love: 

If core values are important to you, this might be your next bank. Founded in 1923, Amalgamated was New York’s first labor bank, and is currently the largest certified B Corp Bank in the United States (and we’re in rare company, because New York has two!). As a mission-oriented community bank, they’re committed to transparency, corporate responsibility, economic justice and empowerment for its clients and community. They were also the “bank of the movement” for Occupy Wall Street.

Did we mention that they offer free online and mobile banking, with 13 branch locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx?

What they offer:

Affordable Checking: A basic checking account that includes online and mobile banking, with no minimum deposit to open and no monthly fees.

Give-Back Savings: A no-fee savings account that earns competitive interest, with no monthly minimums required to earn interest. This savings account lets you support charitable causes while you grow your savings. To do this, Amalgamated matches half the interest you earn and donates it to the participating organization of your choice.

Money Market Account: Requires no monthly fees, with no minimums to open and start earning competitive interest. This is a great option toward diversifying your savings.

Ridgewood Savings Bank

What we love:

Ridgewood is a member-owned community bank and the largest mutual savings bank in New York State. If you are looking to get away from the corporate feel of big banks, Ridgewood’s community-centric approach to banking might be a good fit. Founded in 1921 by 14 entrepreneurs living in Ridgewood, Queens, the bank offers several no- to low-fee account options with 24/7 access via online and mobile banking. They also boast 22 branch locations in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Long Island.

What they offer:

Basic Banking: A straightforward checking account with no monthly direct deposit requirements and a low $3 monthly fee that’s easily waived by enrolling in electronic/paperless statements.

Smart Move Online Savings: A bit of a unicorn, this online savings account has no monthly fees and offers 1.50% APY interest.

90 Day to Three Year IRA CDs: A hybrid offering between a certificate of deposit and an individual retirement account, IRA CDs are a great option for freelancers and artists to start building up their retirement savings.

Dime Bank

What we love:  

If community is what matters to you (and you maybe own one of these t-shirts),  then Brooklyn-based Dime Community Bank hits all the right marks. Founded in 1864, Dime has deep roots in Brooklyn extending over 150 years. You’ve probably walked past their iconic building. With four locations in Williamsburg and 24 more across Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Long Island, Dime offers a variety of no-fee checking and savings accounts, including a student savings account and a fabulously named “Fabulous 50+ Checking.”

What they offer:

Perfectly Free Checking: This one really lives up to its name and then goes a little extra. With no monthly fees, no minimum balances, and no purchase requirements, it also offers 50 free personalized checks and a "thank you" gift for opening.

Direct Interest Checking Account: Brings all the benefits of Perfectly Free Checking, but with the added perk of competitive interest. Already have a checking account elsewhere? No worries—they’ll buy back your unused checks and debit cards from that other financial institution.

Spring Bank

What we love:

Headquartered in the Bronx, Spring Bank was the first B Corp bank in New York. Spring Bank is committed to financial inclusion, supporting underserved consumers and supporting local businesses in here in the city. This community bank offers equal access to transparent and affordable banking products and services from its branches in Harlem and the South Bronx. (Full disclosure: Lifesaver banks with Spring Bank. We really like them.)

What they offer:

Community Chest Savings: Lets you grow your savings while supporting nonprofit organizations in from around the community. Spring Bank will match interest earnings from your savings account and donate it to the participating organization of your choice.

Credit Builder Loan: Well-thought-out offerings like this one are no doubt contributing factors in Spring Bank’s B Corp designation as an ethical financial institution. This loan was designed to help build or restore your credit and credit score, all while saving money. Once qualified, the loaned amount is placed in a savings account to secure the loan, and payments are reported monthly to credit bureaus to quickly improve your credit score. Once the final payment on the loan has been made, your funds are made available. In this way, you can continue to build your savings, or just use the funds without the worry of monthly payments—all after building up your creditworthiness.

Marcus by Goldman Sachs

What we love: 

Haven't you heard? Goldman Sachs has lowered their minimum deposit to open from $20,000,000 to...$1. And they offer all the security of a nearly 150 year-old bank, with the flexible convenience of a robust and elegant online presence. Marcus by Goldman Sachs is an online-only bank that offers some of the highest interest rates around. And of course, they’re probably the best-known bank in the world.

What they offer: 

Online Savings Account: Requires no monthly fees, no minimum balance to open, and a low $1 minimum to start earning 1.60% APY interest. Provides easy access to your money via electronic transfers and live (read: real person!) telephone banking five days a week, as well as 24/7 automated telephone banking and a robust online dashboard.

High Yield CDs: Ranging from six months to six years, and with APYs starting at 0.60% and ranging all the way up to 2.80%, Marcus’s CDs can be a great place for you to place savings or emergency funds while earning competitive interest.

Ally Bank

What we love:

While they’re not a real New Yorker, Ally is one of the largest and oldest pioneers of online banking in the U.S. They offer a wide range of products from checking and savings accounts, to auto and home loans and everything in between.

What they offer:

Interest Checking: Offers variable but competitive interest rates, with no monthly fees or minimum daily balance requirements, and up to $10 reimbursement for ATM fees per statement cycle.

Online Savings: This online savings account requires no monthly service fees and earns a competitive 1.45% APY interest to grow your savings.

Are you a freelancer or artist and don’t see your favorite bank? Drop us a line and let us know. Lifesaver intelligently matches users with the best financial offerings from around their communities, so give us a shout if there’s someone we’re missing!